Vance/Warren Ag Updates, June 2013

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DIAGNOSING INSECT/DISEASE PROBLEMS

Samples may be sent to the NCSU Plant Disease and Insect Clinic ($20 charge). Contact us for details on submitting a sample. In most cases, we will come to the farm in 24 hours or less to assist with sample collection. We are also happy to arrange delivery to the Clinic. In some cases the fee may be waived.

DIAGNOSING NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCIES

Two services are available from NCDA&CS to diagnose nutritional deficiencies: Plant Tissue Sampling ($5) and Problem Area Soil Samples (free). Turnaround on these samples is normally less than a week once received at the lab. For more information or assistance with sample collection, contact NCDA&CS Agronomist Kent Yarborough (252-340-1135) or your Ag Extension Agent. Here are instructions for Plant Tissue Sampling for various crops: http://www.ncagr.gov/agronomi/pictorial.htm

WEEKLY PEST UPDATE

NCSU publishes a “must-read” weekly on-line Pest Update newsletter, with information on field crops, vegetables, and more. The current issue (plus previous issues) is available here: http://ipm.ncsu.edu/current_ipm/pest_news.html

SPLIT SOYBEAN STEMS (Excerpt of an article by Jim Dunphy, NCSU Soybean Specialist)

Soybean stems that have shallow splits on the outside, at or a little above ground level, are a symptom of bad news and good news. The bad news is that the soybean plant has been under stress. The good news is that the stress is over and the plant has recovered…These splits are not a good thing, but they more often than not end up being of little consequence. They provide an entry point for disease organisms, but the organism may not get transported to the split, and even if it does, the weather conditions are often not suitable for development of the disease. As the plant matures further, it seals off the splits, and they become of less consequence. [call or e-mail for the complete article text]

CUCURBIT DOWNY MILDEW

Earlier this month we had a report of this disease on cucumbers in Wayne County. See the following link for more information: http://plantpathology.ces.ncsu.edu/2013/06/pest-news-5313/

ON-LINE PRODUCE GAPS COURSE THROUGH CORNELL

More information here: www.ecornell.com/gaps

AG HEALTH STUDY PARTICIPANTS TO BE SURVEYED THIS SUMMER

If you are one of the many participants in this important study, please return your survey.

SOYBEANS OR SORGHUM BEHIND WHEAT? From Jim Dunphy & Ron Heiniger

If wheat harvest finishes up relatively late (e.g. into July), does that favor soybeans or sorghum as a double crop to plant behind the wheat? It’s about a toss-up. Both can be successfully planted in July, but July is getting late enough for both crops that their yield will be very dependent on the weather. Both can tolerate hot, dry weather if they have to, but neither produces anything marketable while they’re doing it. If planting into a dry seedbed, sorghum will probably produce the better stand (sorghum seed need less moisture to germinate than soybean seeds do), but most producers plant enough soybeans that they may well still end up with a good enough soybean stand. If one crop pencils out to be the more profitable at the prices you can lock in, you probably have your answer. If you’re still uncertain which to plant, our suggestion is to go with the crop you’re more familiar and comfortable with. You’re more likely to manage that one better than the one you know less about.

SMALL GRAIN CROP ALERTS/WHEAT SCAB

Check out this site for great info on wheat scab and more! Note that NCDA&CS can test for the DON toxin, just call or e-mail for details. http://www.smallgrains.ncsu.edu/crop-alerts.html

FUEL STORAGE REQUIREMENTS

As noted in a previous update, farmers who store more than a certain amount of fuel are required to develop a spill containment plan. If you need more details, or would like to learn about training opportunities, please let me know.

Posted by Paul McKenzie, 252.438.8188 (Vance) or 252.257.3640 (Warren)

Written By

Photo of Paul McKenziePaul McKenzieArea Agent, Agriculture (252) 438-8188 (Office) paul_mckenzie@ncsu.eduVance County, North Carolina
Updated on Jun 10, 2013
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